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Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 10 results

  1. The Society for the Promotion of Applied Research in Canine Science (SPARCS) is a non-profit organization now maintained by The National Canine Research Council, created to bridge the gap between canine science and dog lovers by providing an international platform where modern animal behavior science can be presented, discussed, and debated by the greatest minds in canine science. SPARCS hosts an international conference where speakers give in-depth presentations pertaining to questions about dog behavior, welfare, and key issues the world faces in the human-canine bond. SPARCS Video Library - See all presentations Conference Presentations 2018
  2. BPH - English PDF - Behavior and Personality Assessment in Dogs, BPH BPH is a behavioral assessment that has been created with the aim to contribute to better knowledge about the mentality and personality of dogs, all dogs. It should be helpful for breed clubs, breeders and dog owners to have a tool which helps to describe the personality of the dog, whether it is a potential breeding animal, pet or working dog.
  3. In reading more about dog behavior for my project, characteristics such as head shape of dogs and how it can relate to behavior has made me think—are there other physical characteristics that we could look at to make inferences about an animal’s behavior? Dr. Paul McGreevy and others have published articles on how skull characteristics may be related to behavior. In a recently published article, researchers looked at various physical characteristics, including head shape, and correlated them to a behavior assessment involving unfamiliar humans, different stimuli, and various objects. Almost 70,000 dogs were assessed over the course of seven years. From the data, they were able to make some generalizations about dog behavior. For example, they found that shorter dogs tended to show more aggression while taller dogs were usually more playful and friendly. Generalizations were made in this study relative to breeds and sizes of dogs. Additionally, although the authors used a structured instrument, assessment of behavior is always somewhat challenging, but the trends are very interesting. For the past 20 years, leading cattle welfare expert, Dr. Temple Grandin, has asserted that hair whorls may have some genetic basis relating to behavior of cattle. While similar studies on the genetic influence of hair whorls in humans have been published, it is disputed whether it is purely Mendelian inheritance or more complicated. The research on hair whorls in various species has also translated to studies on dogs—from their anatomic basis to how they could be related to behavior. One study looked at the probability of a dog successfully becoming a Guide dog by looking at several factors, including hair whorls. While these unique physical measures show some relation to behavior, they are observed as part of a more comprehensive behavioral assessment. Looking at these characteristics alone should be observed with caution. Generalizations are challenging because of the extreme differences across dog breeds, even when researchers try to take these variations into account. In a previous article from 2012, “Breeding dogs for beauty and behaviour: Why scientists need to do more to develop valid and reliable behaviour assessments for dogs kept as companions”, the authors remind us that ‘Many dogs exhibit behaviours their owners consider undesirable and these dogs may cause disruption and injury to humans and other animals. As a consequence, many are relinquished to shelters.’ They go on to suggest that owner-dog (or we might say owner-breed) mismatch may contribute to the problem, especially if the owner’s interest is more on the appearance of the dog than other factors. ‘The measurement of behaviour and limitations of existing canine behaviour assessments are discussed’ in the article and the authors stress that more accurate assessments are needed. They also stress that behavior, as well as the changing roles of dogs, must be considered in the wider context of dog breeding. So, just to keep you thinking about the complex issues in ethics and welfare of breeding dogs, I wonder: Are there other characteristics beyond these that we should be considering when thinking about dog behavior? How is this incorporated into breeding healthy, happy dogs? Are veterinary students being well-prepared for all these issues? For up-to-date information on project my developments, see A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs. In addition, please check out my first learning module: Introduction to the Module: What is Your Role in Addressing Inherited Disease in Purebred Dogs? ... and ... Stayed tuned for my next educational module looking at Supply and Demand of dogs which will highlight what we know and don’t know about how people choose their dogs and where those dogs come from. Skull Shape image credit: https://cdn.psychologytoday.com/sites/default/files/styles/image-article_inline_full/public/field_blog_entry_images/Dog head shapes.jpg?itok=edD7ujTW Whorl photo credit: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hGoXIo019ic/UOUF0j8MhQI/AAAAAAAABTQ/_V-JO5GXntY/s1600/Whorls2.png
  4. The 2017 International Dog Health Workshop in Paris was the culmination of my summer 2016 project entitled, "A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs." I'm very grateful to have attended this workshop that featured ways we can work collaboratively to improve dog health and welfare. My project poster was displayed among many other interesting research projects. I was impressed by the diversity of attendees including dog owners, veterinarians, kennel club members, researchers, and many more! The International Dog Health Workshop stands out to me among other conferences I've attended because it truly was a working meeting, rather than simply being presented in a lecture format. I left inspired to take action due to the creativity of my group and ideas generated during the meeting. Many thanks to the Behavior and Welfare theme facilitators, Dr. Patricia Olson and Ms. Caroline Kisko, and the group participants. The Behavior and Welfare theme was tasked to address early canine socialization and its influence on creating a suitable lifetime companion. We acknowledged that a more thorough literature search would be beneficial followed by research to address gaps we identify. Beyond research, our group also discussed the need for more positive marketing to the public to communicate the benefits of acquiring a well-socialized puppy. A special thanks to the Skippy Frank Fund for making this project and trip possible. Also many thanks to my personal French translator and mom-extraordinaire, Lindi Dreibelbis, for accompanying me on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. What wonderful memories we made together in Paris.
  5. 3rd Dog Health Workshop Paris, April of 2017... Theme: Behaviour and Welfare Working Groups: were struck across all the themes in order to increase the likelihood of achieving the desired outcomes. Their goal was to collect and collate information; connect relevant stakeholders; and to outline key issues, goals and challenges to be addressed at the Workshop. Behaviour and Welfare Group's Focus: How can we better integrate concepts of welfare, behaviour and health in breeding and raising dogs? Focus on early life / socialization. Task: create a message that would be sent to kennel clubs to market a positive educational message for the public on reasons to achieve/purchase/sell/breed a well socialized dog. Priorities to be modeled in the sub-group's message were: behavior is part of welfare good behavior and health start in utero socialization shortly thereafter need to develop positive and marketing messages for different audiences short, specific, positive messages following a model of 5 freedoms Restrictions: Message to remain short, global (1 size fitting all) with more information available on the DogWellNet website (presented with consideration of the ID of the reader (breeder, owner, vet, kennel club). - Work Product - Socialization Posters - 5" x 7" PDF versions are now available in English and French. It is intended that other country's Kennel/Breed Clubs would translate this poster to their language, if desired. A PowerPoint Template file is available on request. Contact us to obtain the Puppy Socialization Poster PowerPoint Template. We would be very pleased to share this poster in your language with the DWN Community!
  6. Version 1.0.0

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    THIS IS AN OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE - YOU MAY READ THE ARTICLE AND DOWNLOAD THE PDF FROM THE PUBLISHER'S WEBSITE. A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds P. Sandøe, S. V. Kondrup1, P. C. Bennett, B. Forkman, I Meyer, H. F. Proschowsky,J. A. Serpell, T. B. Lund PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0172091 February 24, 2017 Breeds in this study include: Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, French Bulldog, Chihuahua and Cairn Terrier. Abstract "A number of dog breeds suffer from welfare problems due to extreme phenotypes and high levels of inherited diseases but the popularity of such breeds is not declining. Using a survey of owners of two popular breeds with extreme physical features (French Bulldog and Chihuahua), one with a high load of inherited diseases not directly related to conformation (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), and one representing the same size range but without extreme conformation and with the same level of disease as the overall dog population (Cairn Terrier), we investigated this seeming paradox. We examined planning and motivational factors behind acquisition of the dogs, and whether levels of experienced health and behavior problems were associated with the quality of the owner-dog relationship and the intention to reprocure a dog of the same breed. Owners of each of the four breeds (750/breed) were randomly drawn from a nationwide Danish dog registry and invited to participate. Of these, 911 responded, giving a final sample of 846. There were clear differences between owners of the four breeds with respect to degree of planning prior to purchase, with owners of Chihuahuas exhibiting less. Motivations behind choice of dog were also different. Health and other breed attributes were more important to owners of Cairn Terriers, whereas the dog's personality was reported to be more important for owners of French Bulldogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels but less important for Chihuahua owners. Higher levels of health and behavior problems were positively associated with a closer owner-dog relationship for owners of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Chihuahuas but, for owners of French Bulldogs, high levels of problems were negatively associated with an intention to procure the same breed again. In light of these findings, it appears less paradoxical that people continue to buy dogs with welfare problems." The "study aimed to answer the following questions: 1) Do motivations for acquiring a dog, and pre-purchase owner characteristics, differ between owners of the four breeds? 2) Do levels of expenditure on veterinary treatments and health and behavior problems experienced differ for owners of the four dog breeds? 3) Do motivations prior to acquisition, and owners' experiences of health and behavior problems with their dogs, explain differences in the quality of the owner-dog relationship between the four breeds? 4) Do intentions of acquiring the same breed the next time a dog is to be procured change as a function of experienced health and behavior problems?"
  7. An exciting, multidisciplinary event has just concluded in London, UK. Attended by renowned scientists and researchers from fields including genetics, behaviour, epidemiology, animal breeding and more as well as veterinarians and behavior practictioners from around the world, this event was designed to promote international awareness, interest and collaboration. Behavior of dogs is a complex interplay of genetic and environmental - dog and human factors and can best be addressed by interaction and collaboration. Information on topics and presentations is now available on their site: Canine Behaviour and Genetics Presentation PDFs (website and presentations are not currently available 5-11-2017) And further discussion below ... This article was edited on 5-11-2017; please note, some referenced content/links are no longer available.
  8. September 2016 News from PAUL McGREEVY | Professor Faculty of Veterinary Science THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY IT to pups’ rescue!!! The University of Sydney recently launched a world-first app that will not only help owners help their dogs be happier and healthier, but could also play a life-saving role by teaching young dogs to behave better.
  9. Check out the latest news - This free App Doglogbook is a terrific way to help owners manage their dog's behavior. For more information see DogWellNet's article... Doglogbook OR - Click the DOGLOGBOOK logo on the right side of this page to go to the Doglogbook website. The App is available from Google Play and Itunes. This app was just recently featured in ABC’s Catalyst 2-part series “Making Dogs Happy”. Check out this clip from the broadcast! We at DogWellNet extend our thanks to the team of researchers from the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney (Australia) and to Paul McGreevy for their work in developing this app and sharing information on it with the DWN team. THANK YOU for making a positive difference in the lives of dogs!
  10. Per Arvelius - Canine Behaviour & Genetics (external link access) Per Arvelius - Canine Behaviour and Genetics Meeting London 26-28 June 2015 Summary 1. Dog behaviour shows genetic variation and can therefore be improved by breeding 2. Modern techniques for estimating breeding values have a huge potential to increase genetic improvement of dog behaviour 3. Behavioural measurements should (usually) be objective and neutral, and summarized into composite traits Per Arvelius presentation from the Canine Genetics and Behavior Meeting - London - June 26-28-2015 Genetic Evaluation of Behaviour in Dogs (external link - access) Doctoral Thesis " A dog's behavioural characteristics are important for the dog, for the dog owner and for society as a whole. Behavioural traits can be changed by breeding, but to be effective when selecting breeding animals, good methods for measuring behaviour are essential. " "The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the prospects for improving dog behaviour by breeding. Dog breeders would potentially benefit substantially in terms of faster genetic progress for important behavioural traits, if modern methods for genetic evaluation were applied. For this to function well, it is essential to have good methods for measuring the traits of interest. In this thesis, a number of dog behavioural measurement methods were evaluated for their potential to be used for genetic evaluation, and with the purpose of advancing our understanding of factors affecting the usefulness of behavioural measurements for breeding purposes." Per Arvelius -- Genetic Evaluation of Behaviour in Dogs
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